The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America

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Vintage #ad - A definitive book on american history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels. A new york times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North.

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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

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Vintage #ad - Through the breadth of its narrative, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, this book is destined to become a classic. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, remarkable, and riveting work, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land.

Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. Louis post-dispatch  • the christian science monitor  From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, pulitzer prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration #ad - National book critics circle award winnerlynton history prize winnerheartland award winner dayton literary peace prize finalist      named one of the ten best books of the year bythe new york times  • usa today • o: the oprah magazine • amazon • publishers weekly •  salon • newsday  • the daily beast named one of the best books of the year bythe new yorker •  the washington Post • The Economist • Boston Globe • San Francisco Chronicle •  Chicago  Tribune • Entertainment Weekly • Philadelphia Inquirer • The Guardian • The Seattle Times • St.

She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, altering our cities, our country, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: ida mae gladney, who left louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, saw his family fall, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.

Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, drive, and culture and improved them with discipline, faith, and hard work.

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Stuck in Place: Urban Neighborhoods and the End of Progress toward Racial Equality

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University of Chicago Press #ad - Sharkey argues for urban policies that have the potential to create transformative and sustained changes in urban communities and the families that live within them, and he outlines a durable urban policy agenda to move in that direction. In the 1960s, many believed that the civil rights movement’s successes would foster a new era of racial equality in America.

To understand what went wrong, Patrick Sharkey argues that we have to understand what has happened to African American communities over the last several decades. Four decades later, the degree of racial inequality has barely changed. This multigenerational nature of neighborhood inequality also means that a new kind of urban policy is necessary for our nation’s cities.

Stuck in Place: Urban Neighborhoods and the End of Progress toward Racial Equality #ad - Some of the most persistent forms of racial inequality, such as gaps in income and test scores, can only be explained by considering the neighborhoods in which black and white families have lived over multiple generations. In stuck in place, persistent segregation, sharkey describes how political decisions and social policies have led to severe disinvestment from black neighborhoods, declining economic opportunities, and a growing link between African American communities and the criminal justice system.

As a result, neighborhood inequality that existed in the 1970s has been passed down to the current generation of African Americans.

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American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers #ad - American immigration and Citizenship shows that this issue is far from new. The author concludes that a highly-interconnected world presents no easy answers and offers no single immigration policy that will work for all time. The book includes a mix of laws, speeches, constitutional provisions, and judicial decisions from each period.

One of the most contentious issues in America today is the status of immigration. Vile furthermore traces the interconnections between issues of citizenship and issues of immigration, indicating that public opinion and legislation has often contained contradictory strains. Although the primary focus has been on national laws and decisions, some of the readings clearly indicate the stakes that states, which are often affected disproportionately by such laws, have also had in this process.

American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History #ad - In this book, john vile provides context for contemporary debates on the topic through key historical documents presented alongside essays that interpret their importance for the reader.

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Transaction Man: The Rise of the Deal and the Decline of the American Dream

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Stable institutions have given way to frictionless transactions, which are celebrated no matter what collateral damage they generate. Incisive and sweeping, transaction Man is the definitive account of the reengineering of America and the enormous impact it has had on us all. Today, silicon valley titans such as the LinkedIn cofounder and venture capitalist Reid Hoffman hope “networks” can reknit our social fabric.

Lemann interweaves these fresh and vivid profiles with a history of the Morgan Stanley investment bank from the 1930s through the financial crisis of 2008, while also tracking the rise and fall of a working-class Chicago neighborhood and the family-run car dealerships at its heart. Adolf berle, imagined a society dominated by large corporations, Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s chief theorist of the economy, which a newly powerful federal government had forced to become benign and stable institutions, contributing to the public good by offering stable employment and generous pensions.

The concentration of great wealth has coincided with the fraying of social ties and the rise of inequality. An amazon best history book of 2019"A splendid and beautifully written illustration of the tremendous importance public policy has for the daily lives of ordinary people. Ryan cooper, washington MonthlyOver the last generation, the United States has undergone seismic changes.

Transaction Man: The Rise of the Deal and the Decline of the American Dream #ad - By the 1970s, the corporations’ large stockholders grew restive under this regime, Harvard Business School’s Michael Jensen, and their chief theoretician, insisted that firms should maximize shareholder value, whatever the consequences. How did all this come about?in transaction man, nicholas Lemann explains the United States’—and the world’s—great transformation by examining three remarkable individuals who epitomized and helped create their eras.

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The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy, Second Edition

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University of Chicago Press #ad - Wilson's incisive analysis. Robert greenstein, New York Times Book Review. As policymakers grapple with the problems of an enlarged underclass they—as well as community leaders and all concerned Americans of all races—would be advised to examine Mr. Renowned american sociologist william Julius Wilson takes a look at the social transformation of inner city ghettos, offering a sharp evaluation of the convergence of race and poverty.

Rejecting both conservative and liberal interpretations of life in the inner city, Wilson offers essential information and a number of solutions to policymakers. The truly disadvantaged is a wide-ranging examination, and education from the 1950s onwards, looking at the relationship between race, employment, with surprising and provocative findings.

The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy, Second Edition #ad - This second edition also includes a new afterword from Wilson himself that brings the book up to date and offers fresh insight into its findings. The truly disadvantaged should spur critical thinking in many quarters about the causes and possible remedies for inner city poverty.

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Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration

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University of Chicago Press #ad - Grossman’s rich, detailed analysis of black migration to Chicago during World War I and its aftermath brilliantly captures the cultural meaning of the movement.

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The Making of African America: The Four Great Migrations

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Penguin Books #ad - Certain to gar­ner widespread media attention, The Making of African America is a bold new account of a long and crucial chapter of American history. The culture of black america is constantly evolving, affected by and affecting places as far away from one another as Biloxi, Chicago, Kingston, and Lagos.

In effect, berlin rewrites the master narrative of African America, challenging the traditional presentation of a linear path of progress. He finds instead a dynamic of change in which eras of deep rootedness alternate with eras of massive move­ment, tradition giving way to innovation. A leading historian offers a sweeping new account of the african american experience over four centuries four great migrations defined the history of black people in America: the violent removal of Africans to the east coast of North America known as the Middle Passage; the relocation of one million slaves to the interior of the antebellum South; the movement of more than six million blacks to the industrial cities of the north and west a century later; and since the late 1960s, the Caribbean, the arrival of black immigrants from Africa, South America, and Europe.

The Making of African America: The Four Great Migrations #ad - Ira berlin's magisterial new account of these passages evokes both the terrible price and the moving triumphs of a people forcibly and then willingly migrating to America. These epic migra­tions have made and remade African American life.

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Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City: Decency, Violence and the Moral Life of the Inner City

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - . Unsparing and important. Elijah anderson's incisive book delineates the code and examines it as a response to the lack of jobs that pay a living wage, to the stigma of race, to rampant drug use, to alienation and lack of hope. An informative, clearheaded and sobering book. Jonathan yardley, but in fact, washington post 1999 critic's ChoiceInner-city black America is often stereotyped as a place of random violence, violence in the inner city is regulated through an informal but well-known code of the street.

. This unwritten set of rules—based largely on an individual's ability to command respect—is a powerful and pervasive form of etiquette, governing the way in which people learn to negotiate public spaces.

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The Great Migration: Journey to the North

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HarperCollins #ad - Before jan spivey gilchrist was born, her mother moved from Arkansas and her father moved from Mississippi. We were one family among the many thousands. Both settled in Chicago, Illinois. Mama and daddy leaving home, their dreams and their children, with their hopes and their courage, coming to the city, to make a better life.

When eloise greenfield was four months old, her family moved from their home in Parmele, to Washington, North Carolina, D. C. Though none of them knew it at the time, they had all become part of the Great Migration. In this collection of poems and collage artwork, award winners Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist gracefully depict the experiences of families like their own, who found the courage to leave their homes behind during The Great Migration and make new lives for themselves elsewhere.

The Great Migration: Journey to the North #ad - The great Migration concludes with a bibliography. Supports the Common Core State Standards.

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The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity

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Oxford University Press #ad - King, walker percy, elizabeth Spencer, Charley Pride, and Shelby Foote. Cotton obsessed, negro obsessed, " Rupert Vance called it in 1935. In this comprehensive account, cobb offers new insight into "the most southern place on earth, " untangling the enigma of grindingly poor but prolifically creative Mississippi Delta.

Nowhere but in the mississippi Delta, " he said, "are antebellum conditions so nearly preserved. This crescent of bottomlands between memphis and vicksburg, remains in some ways what it was in 1860: a land of rich soil, wealthy planters, lined by the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers, and desperate poverty--the blackest and poorest counties in all the South.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity #ad - Exploring the rich black culture of the delta, cobb explains how it survived and evolved in the midst of poverty and oppression, beginning with the first settlers in the overgrown, disease-ridden Delta before the Civil War to the bitter battles and incomplete triumphs of the civil rights era. And yet it is a cultural treasure house as well--the home of Muddy Waters, B.

B. Cobb offers a comprehensive history of the Delta, from its first white settlement in the 1820s to the present. Painting a fascinating portrait of the development and survival of the Mississippi Delta, a society and economy that is often seen as the most extreme in all the South, James C.

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